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Etutorshub is a live learning platform that connects students and professional tutors, we helps students learn difficult concepts and get better grades by connecting them with professional teachers in a digital classroom, whether you need help understanding a complex topic or want to take your academic goals.
create by the team behind teach away , with maximum years of experience hiring top teachers and creating innovative e- learning programs. Etutorshub is a personalized student focused learning platform that meets the needs of students in a digital age. Students can Compare qualifications, hourly rates, and reviews to find the right expert for you. We’re always looking for talented tutors. Set your own rate, get paid and make a difference.

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Educational Blogs

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Adapting an Effective Math Collaboration Activity for Distance Learning An instructional coach and math teacher who developed a powerful model for student collaboration have tweaked it for the pandemic.

cooperative learning has been highlighted by educational researchers john hattie and robert marzano as a high-yield strategy that “adds value to whole-class instruction and to individual work” by boosting both engagement and collaboration. last year, i leveraged hattie and marzano’s research to partner with high school math teacher kathleen janysek in creating a cooperative learning strategy we called try it, talk it, color it, check it.

when we implemented the strategy, we used the three components that hattie and marzano indicate are essential to success—structure, small groups, and explicit instruction on how to work effectively in groups—and the results were dramatic in terms of the look, sound, and feel of kathleen’s algebra 1 classroom. silence turned into discussion and debate, and the students’ dependence on their teacher transformed into independence. ultimately, kathleen and i created a new approach that replaced traditional whiteboard practice and engaged all students rather than most.

when distance learning became widespread, however, we needed to revisit the try it, talk it, color it, check it model to see if we could adapt it for a virtual classroom. our approach involved anticipating the emotional and academic needs of our students and thinking through, step by step, how the activity could unfold, from presenting a problem to soliciting feedback.

planning the transformation
kathleen and i started by looking at tools that could foster strong student discourse and incorporate the structure, small groups, and explicit instruction hattie and marzano recommend. we landed on jamboard to create a structured space that was clear and effective and used breakout rooms for small group settings.

to guide students to work effectively in groups, given the isolation our students are facing, we turned to social and emotional learning (sel) prompts to infuse that component with intentional building of relationship skills. we also aimed to make expectations for student participation clear.

the process
in a virtual setting, the try it, talk it, color it, check it process began with independent work time. we displayed a problem and gave students one or two minutes to try to solve it on their own. this independent try it work time was essential to give students an opportunity to generate their own ideas and/or questions about the problem.

when time was up, we assigned students to breakout rooms with an sel-focused prompt (e.g., “what makes you feel happiest?”). the prompts we selected, examples of “listening circles,” were supported by casel’s research on helping students develop their social awareness and relationship skills.

many of the students in the class were in the routine of having their cameras off and microphones muted during class time; we also faced the challenge of students going into breakout rooms and not engaging with each other unless we showed them the way. incorporating sel prompts broke down these barriers in several ways.

first, students had an entry point for speaking right when they went into the breakout rooms, and they were more energetic in their discussions—more so than when we didn’t use sel prompts at all. furthermore, because the prompts were tied to sel competencies, discussing them in breakout rooms moved beyond the idea that they were just for fun, and we began seeing the conversations as purposeful student interactions, reinforcing the notion that all voices are heard and valued in this process.

once students were comfortable sharing with each other in each breakout room, they started the mathematical problem-solving process of explaining their strategies and solutions with each other—the talk it phase of the model. when they agreed on an answer, they were directed to use a speaker and scribe structure: the scribe dragged the problem to a specific spot on jamboard and the speaker explained their steps for the scribe to type up. finally, students discussed how confident they were in their solution, which the scribe then noted with a color-coded sticky note (color it) on the jamboard (green = “we got it and can teach others;” yellow = “we have ideas but are a bit uncertain;” pink = “our answer is probably wrong and we need help.”).

after about five minutes, students returned from breakout rooms to the main session, and kathleen debriefed by sharing a selected group’s jamboard page and asking a member of that group to share out. the color coding helped us pinpoint areas of need for further instruction and discussion, and it was exciting to hear students share their thinking and group’s process with added confidence.

after each problem, we repeated the process of try it, talk it, color it, check it, and while that was happening, kathleen and i bounced among breakout rooms. as coaching partners, kathleen and i listened to and supported student dialogue and would quickly confer together to identify which group we would select to explain or clear up misconceptions—the check it phase.

wrapping up
in debriefing the process with students, we sought their feedback using the last page of the jamboard to measure their engagement and confidence in their understanding of the content. kathleen explained that this feedback would help inform our instructional practice and enable us to also follow up with any students who needed additional support. i loved how this part of the process provided a safe space for students to reflect on the activity and give honest feedback—and take ownership of their learning.

we were excited to see students become highly engaged—one student unmuted to say how much fun they had during this activity. seeing and hearing their feedback confirmed how powerful this strategy is, even in a virtual setting, and how collaboration and rich mathematical discussion can take place anywhere if we intentionally use tools to enhance learning.

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Strategies for Working Efficiently When Teaching Online Teaching in distance and hybrid models is time-consuming, so teachers need to make sure they use their time well.

teaching in a hybrid in-person/remote model requires significantly more planning than teaching in the traditional classroom model. tasks that were once quick, such as monitoring students’ progress during class and following up on late and missing assignments, have become laborious, and everyday activities like making sure that students have access to material from the school library and determining the best technology tools to meet students’ needs take a tremendous amount of planning. more than ever, it’s important that i use my time efficiently and allow myself time to recharge.

organizing tasks
given the variety of tasks that i need to complete, i create a detailed, handwritten list every friday. i divide it into four parts (long-term goals, do now, creating, and doing), which helps me to stay organized and use my time more effectively.

the long-term goals section is for anything that does not have to be immediately done and often includes things that i hope to accomplish but are optional. i write these out on the side of my list in the upper right corner, and whenever i have extra time, i work on them. the do now section is a running log of all the things i need to do in the next 24 hours, and i mark them off as i go. the creating section is for anything that requires focus and critical thinking. this space is often filled with tasks such as designing assessments, creating new units, or writing a complex email. the doing section is for tasks that do not require much mental effort. this space is often filled with items such as making copies, grading, or entering grades in the grade book.

by organizing tasks into sections, i can clearly see if i have a lot of the same type of tasks and then tackle them at the same time. once i get into a rhythm, i move much faster through tasks.

i do the most complex tasks when i’m at my best. for me that’s first thing in the morning, and i try to get to work 30 minutes early so that i have time to knock out as many of the creating tasks or long-term goals as possible. i’m amazed by how i can sometimes do more in 30 minutes before school than in an hour in the middle of the day.

i rewrite my list on friday afternoons on a new sheet of paper—it’s satisfying to see how much i do not have to carry over to the next week, and the list reminds me of things i need to make time for.

plan for breaks
when i plan breaks, i’m more productive and avoid getting distracted and taking them unintentionally. this also allows me to use my time to be productive and to reset. if i need to think critically about a new idea or complex problem, i take a walk around the school. going for a walk means i’m not distracted and feel refreshed and ready to tackle the task when i return to my desk.

i know how easy it can be to start talking to a friend at work and then realize that i’ve spent my entire free period chatting. sometimes that’s just what i need, but if i know that i have a lot of things to do, i make a point of waiting to start the conversation when there are only 10 minutes left in the period so that i will get a break, but with a hard stop.

say no and trust
saying no when asked to do something has always been difficult for me. i worry about letting people down, i feel responsible for things that logically i know are not my obligation, i want to do whatever i can to help, and i have a hard time waiting on others to get things done. however, i have realized that there are times when it is better to say no. when deciding if i will say yes or no, i consider if it is something that i have the ability and time to do well and if taking it on will compromise my other commitments.

i also am not great at dividing tasks and prefer to do everything myself, but i have come to see the value in trusting colleagues to divide and conquer. if a colleague volunteers to do something, i let them, instead of insisting that i can do it myself.

grading strategically
by making intentional decisions about what assignments i grade, creating rubrics, and using online tools, i can give detailed feedback on graded assignments without spending every evening grading papers.

when deciding what to formally grade, i consider the purpose of the assignment. i ask my students to write almost every day, but if my intention is for them to process their learning or organize their ideas, grading isn’t critical. if students are sharing out their ideas in a presentation, i assign grades while they are presenting. if students are completing multiple variations on the same type of assignment, such as reflections about a novel, i will select just a few to grade.

when assigning lengthy projects or papers, i take the time up front to create a detailed rubric, knowing that i will save a significant amount of time during grading.

when i need to quickly check understanding, i use digital tools like socrative, quizlet, kahoot, and google forms that can automatically grade assignments and provide students with instant feedback. i can type much faster than i can hand write, so i have students turn in many of their writing assignments on google classroom, which allows me to type comments.

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Strategies to Encourage Students to Turn Their Cameras On Incorporating SEL approaches, playing games, and giving students options can inspire them to show their faces.

while there is a tremendous amount of value to being able to see your students’ faces during distance learning, we can’t force them to be on camera, just as during in-person teaching, we can’t force unengaged students to lift their heads or remove hats or hoodies that obscure their faces.

with experimentation and persistence, however, you can arrive at strategies that work. whether they need options, encouragement, or trust in order to turn their cameras on, there’s likely a solution that is the right fit for your classroom, circumstances, lessons, and students.

sel strategies to encourage camera use
if you want to incorporate social and emotional learning (sel) strategies to prompt camera use among your students, start with the recognition that words matter: our communication with our students needs to be rooted in community, not compliance.

from there, you could leverage any number of sel approaches.

build relationships. focus on trust, both teacher to student and student to student. students who know they are safe and cared for by their community will be more comfortable having their cameras on.

survey students. ask students individually or in a google form what deters them from using a camera and what would make them comfortable. once you identify the barriers to camera use, you can collaborate with students to reduce or remove those barriers.

use icebreakers. try community-building activities that encourage camera use. for example, prompt students to “find the largest yellow thing in your house that you can safely bring back to the camera.” as a variation, try within reach. pass the pen is also a playful approach to building community remotely.

play games. rock, paper, scissors works well in a remote classroom setting, as do pictionary and charades. explore 25 games to play on zoom, which includes options that work for different ages.

visually vote or share understanding. have students vote with their thumbs up or down on a topic, or poll the class with a fist-to-five, a simple signaling system that can engage reluctant students and build consensus within a group.

encourage students who have social capital to use their cameras. the best role models are likely in your classroom already. consider using a google form to ask students to name three classmates with whom they would most like to be in a breakout room or with whom they would most like to work on a group project. the students with the most requests are likely the students with the most social capital and can be positive role models for camera-on activities. you can also consider using a sociogram to identify the best role models when it comes to camera use.

be empathetic. share with your students times when you haven’t felt like being on camera in a meeting. talk about how you prepare yourself to turn on the camera, even when you’re not in the mood. if you’re self-conscious about looking prepared or about multitasking while on camera, talk about it. sharing will bring out your humanness.

zoom tips to encourage camera use
admit students into class one by one. arrive to class five minutes early and enable the waiting room. as students arrive, admit and greet them individually, and check in with them about camera use. you might be able to check in with only a few students before needing to “admit all,” but those who arrive early and have their cameras on will gain comfort from being in a small group to start. plus, as the other students enter, they will register that some cameras are already on.

use the “ask to start video” option. as the host, you can invite participants to turn on their cameras by clicking the participant’s black screen; then click the horizontal “…” and select “ask to start video.”

send a private message in the chat. use the chat feature to welcome the student, check in with them, and encourage them to turn on their camera.

encourage virtual backgrounds. it could be that a student is resistant to using their camera because of their home environment, so teach them how to use zoom virtual backgrounds or introduce them to unscreen.

instructional tips to encourage camera use
let students know when cameras can be optional. brainstorm with your class times when it is fine to have the camera off and when it’s best to have it on. discussing camera-optional policies and having camera routines provide students with predictability and autonomy.

allow students to show only part of their body or space on camera. some students are particularly self-conscious about exposing their face on camera. consider allowing students to dip their toe into their onscreen time by encouraging them to turn the camera so that only a portion of their body appears.

provide options for rubrics that include camera usage. at the onset of a lesson or unit, share rubrics or criteria for success for a given objective. if having the camera on is relevant to your objective, then consider including it as a criterion for success. many students will align themselves with the rubric if they know the expectations upfront before instruction begins. to avoid forced compliance, consider providing options for students to create their own rubric based on the objective.

have students submit a prerecorded video demonstrating skill or objective. if students need to visibly demonstrate a skill, allow them to make a recorded video. while the whole class won’t see it, you can still assess the student and build their comfort with being on camera.

ask students to suggest alternatives. your students might have insights into other ways to participate and share their learning visually. many educators have found that students will share videos on tiktok, vimeo, or private youtube channels or instagram accounts.

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